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Men in Women's Bathrooms


What's your thoughts on this? #prop1 #vote
Posted by Majic 102.1 on Friday, October 9, 2015


Actually, I don't have a problem with it.  Do you know how hard it is to have an older autistic child who cannot go into the bathroom with you?  And yet, he's independent to the point where taking him to one of those single-toilet-and-sink "family" restrooms is too much of an invasion of his privacy (and mine, if I need to go).

What I do have a problem with is stalker, rapist-y men hiding out in the women's bathroom, and then pretending they're suddenly having an identity crisis if and when they're confronted.

In my opinion, the whole "let transgender people use the restroom of the gender they identify with" argument isn't even about transgender people.  Because guess what.  Truly transgender people make a pretty big effort to pass and you're probably not going to know.  It's not a lifestyle I agree with, but I'm just saying.

I think it's more about expectations of privacy and decorum.  Our culture may be changing, but many of us are uncomfortable enough trying to poop when there is a one-inch gap between the partitions in the stalls, and about a foot and a half near everyone's feet.  It's hard enough to try to get "stuff done" when toddlers peeping under the stall can see you.  We'll all hold it in and die if actual regular guys could see us dispose of our used sanitary products (thanks for the image? you're welcome).

So.  If we're changing things, how can we assure people they have a reasonable expectation of privacy and safety?  Because 1. I don't think transgender people are going away, and 2. I don't think it's unreasonable that we feel safe and have at least a reasonable amount of privacy in the bathroom.

Comments

  1. I wouldn't like a complete strange man in the restroom with me or my daughters! In our own homes we share, but in public? No thank you!
    And I used to take Griffin and my sons when they were young into the women's restroom with me so they were safe from strange men in the Men's restroom! No one is safe from perverts. Oh and I believe if you were born a man/woman, no amount of SURGERY will change THAT fact.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I don't use these but I have noticed them in pubs and restaurants.
    If there is a ladies I use it.
    Merle..........

    ReplyDelete
  3. Usually sanitary disposal units are set inside each stall, here in Aus. anyway, so I don't see how men could be watching unless they're peering under the door, or over it. Beside the point anyway. I agree with keeping ladies for the ladies and men's for the men. If those "family' toilets had a privacy panel between the toilet and the rest of the room, independent autistic children might feel more comfortable, but I imagine it would take a lot of lobbying to get those installed. Here in Adelaide I know of one"family" toilet that has a baby-changing area, and two stalls with doors the children can close while the parent waits in the larger baby-change area. It's a unisex facility, so if dad is shopping with the kids and they have to go, he can take them in there.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yeah, I'd agree with either keeping women with women and men with men OR mixing everyone and fixing the stalls differently and then you plan to go in groups for protection. Either way. Just pick one. :)

    I do NOT like this idea of men being able to pretend to be women and walking into the bathroom, right where I would have no other people around to protect me, yk?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I think the solution is replacing gender specific group restrooms with individual stalls to provide everyone the privacy they need

    ReplyDelete

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